Adrian Lamo testimony at Bradley Manning trial

This is worth posting as it is a pivotal section of the case. I can appreciate that Lamo candidly points out Manning did *not* want to funnel this information to foreign powers, which is important to the case. Ugh snitches… Lamo is @6 on Twitter.

Locally there is a rally downtown on Thursday June 6th. Check it out!

UPDATE: Moar Transcripts: https://pressfreedomfoundation.org/bradley-manning-transcripts

MOAR: Bradley Manning Support Network. Follow . Latest today from the Truck: "The CFAA charges are being disproven rapidly."

Art here from Clark :

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via Jenna:

DAVID COOMBS: He told you he was an intelligence analyst?

ADRIAN LAMO: Yes.

DAVID COOMBS: He said to you, he thought he would reach out to somebody like you who would possibly understand?

ADRIAN LAMO: Yes.

DAVID COOMBS: During this initial chat conversation he told

you about his life and his upbringing?

ADRIAN LAMO: In some amount of detail, yes.

DAVID COOMBS: He told you that he was being challenged due to a gender identity issue?

ADRIAN LAMO: Yes.

DAVID COOMBS: He also told you that he had been questioning his gender for years, but started to come to terms with that with his gender during the deployment?

ADRIAN LAMO: Yes.

DAVID COOMBS: He told you he believed he had made a huge mess?

ADRIAN LAMO: Yes, he did.

DAVID COOMBS: And he confessed that he was emotionally fractured?

ADRIAN LAMO: Yes.

DAVID COOMBS: He said he was talking to you as somebody that needed moral and emotional support?

ADRIAN LAMO: Yes.

DAVID COOMBS: At this point he said he was trying not to end up killing himself?

ADRIAN LAMO: That is also correct.

DAVID COOMBS: He told you that he was feeling desperate and

isolated?

ADRIAN LAMO: Yes.

DAVID COOMBS: He described himself as a broken sole?

ADRIAN LAMO: Yes, he did.

DAVID COOMBS: He said his life was falling apart and he didn't have anyone to talk to?

ADRIAN LAMO: Yes, he did.

DAVID COOMBS: And he said he was honestly scared?

ADRIAN LAMO: He also said that.

DAVID COOMBS: He told you that he had no one he could trust?

ADRIAN LAMO: Correct.

DAVID COOMBS: And he told you he needed a lot of help?

ADRIAN LAMO: Yes, he did.

DAVID COOMBS: He ended up apologizing to you on several occasions for pouring out his heart to you since you were total strangers?

ADRIAN LAMO: Correct.

DAVID COOMBS: Now at one point he asked you if you had access to classified networks and so on, incredible things, awful things, things that belonged to the public domain, not on some servers dark room in Washington, D.C. What would you do? Do you recall him asking you that question?

ADRIAN LAMO: Yes, I did.

DAVID COOMBS: He told you he thought that the information that he had would have impact on entire world?

ADRIAN LAMO: That is also correct.

DAVID COOMBS: He said the information would disclose casualty figures in Iraq?

ADRIAN LAMO: Yes.

DAVID COOMBS: He believed the State Department, First World Countries exploited the Third World Countries?

ADRIAN LAMO: He made that representation, yes.

DAVID COOMBS: And he told you that the cables detailed what was criminal political fact dealings?

ADRIAN LAMO: Yes.

DAVID COOMBS: He believed that everywhere there was a U.S. post there was a diplomatic scandal?

ADRIAN LAMO: That he did.

DAVID COOMBS: He told you that he believed it was important that the information got out?

ADRIAN LAMO: Correct.

DAVID COOMBS: He thought that if the information got out, it might actually change something?

ADRIAN LAMO: Yes.

DAVID COOMBS: He told you he did not believe in good guys versus bad guys anymore?

ADRIAN LAMO: Yes.

DAVID COOMBS: He only believed in a plethora of states acting in self-interest?

ADRIAN LAMO: Correct.

DAVID COOMBS: He told you he thought he was maybe too idealistic?

ADRIAN LAMO: Correct.

DAVID COOMBS: He told you that he was always a type of person that tried to investigate to find out the truth?

ADRIAN LAMO: Something I could appreciate, yes.

DAVID COOMBS: And based upon what he saw, he told you he could not let information just stay inside?

ADRIAN LAMO: Yes.

DAVID COOMBS: He said he could not separate himself from others?

ADRIAN LAMO: Correct.

DAVID COOMBS: He felt connected to everybody?

ADRIAN LAMO: Yes.

DAVID COOMBS: Even told you it felt like we were all distant family?

ADRIAN LAMO: Engagement.

DAVID COOMBS: And he said he cared?

ADRIAN LAMO: Yes.

DAVID COOMBS: He told you that he thought he would keep track -- keep track of people that his job impacted?

ADRIAN LAMO: Correct.

DAVID COOMBS: And he wanted to make sure that everybody was okay?

ADRIAN LAMO: Yes.

DAVID COOMBS: He told you that the way he separated himself from other analysts was, he cared about people?

ADRIAN LAMO: He said that, yes.

DAVID COOMBS: PFC Manning told you he followed humanist values?

ADRIAN LAMO: Yes, he did.

DAVID COOMBS: He said he had dogs tags saying "humanist" on it?

ADRIAN LAMO: Yes.

DAVID COOMBS: Do you know what it means to be a humanist?

ADRIAN LAMO: From my understanding the importance of human life and human beings and has a structure of morality.

DAVID COOMBS: PFC Manning told you that at the time he was feeling (inaudible) and no one seemed to see that or care?

ADRIAN LAMO: Yes.

DAVID COOMBS: He told you that he was bothered that nobody seemed to care?

ADRIAN LAMO: Yes, he did.

DAVID COOMBS: He said he thought apathy was far worse than active participation?

ADRIAN LAMO: Yes.

DAVID COOMBS: He told you that he preferred the truth (Inaudible)?

ADRIAN LAMO: Yes, he did.

DAVID COOMBS: He also told you that he was maybe too traumatized to really care about the consequences to him?

ADRIAN LAMO: Yes.

DAVID COOMBS: He told you that he wasn't brave. He was weak?

ADRIAN LAMO: Yes.

DAVID COOMBS: He said he was not so much scared of getting caught and facing consequences as he was of being misunderstood?

ADRIAN LAMO: Yes.

DAVID COOMBS: At one point you asked him what his end game was, correct?

ADRIAN LAMO: Yes, I did.

DAVID COOMBS: And he told you, hopefully worldwide discussions, debates and reforms?

ADRIAN LAMO: Yes, he did.

DAVID COOMBS: He told you that the reaction to the (Inaudible)?

ADRIAN LAMO: Yes.

DAVID COOMBS: And he said he wanted people to see the truth?

ADRIAN LAMO: Correct.

DAVID COOMBS: He said without information you can't make informed decision as a whole?

ADRIAN LAMO: Yes, he did.

DAVID COOMBS: And he told you to, he was hoping that people would actually change if they saw the information?

ADRIAN LAMO: Correct.

DAVID COOMBS: He also told you that he recognized that he may be just young, naive and stupid?

ADRIAN LAMO: Yes.

DAVID COOMBS: And at one point you asked him why he didn't just sell the information to Russia or China?

ADRIAN LAMO: Correct.

DAVID COOMBS: And he told you that the information belonged in the public domain?

ADRIAN LAMO: Yes, he did.

DAVID COOMBS: He believed that information was in the public domain and should be for the public good?

ADRIAN LAMO: Yes.

DAVID COOMBS: You asked him how long he had been helping out WikiLeaks at one point?

ADRIAN LAMO: Yes, I did.

DAVID COOMBS: He told you that he essentially had been --

THE COURT: Sustained. Hearsay.

MR. COOMBS: Very well, Your Honor.

BY MR. COOMBS:

DAVID COOMBS: At one point he told you that his belief or his feelings were that he wanted to eventually go into politics?

ADRIAN LAMO: Yes.

DAVID COOMBS: And at the time he was thinking that humanity could accomplish a lot, if smart people with ideas cooperated with each other?

ADRIAN LAMO: Correct.

DAVID COOMBS: At anytime did he say he had no loyalty to America?

ADRIAN LAMO: Not in those words, no.

DAVID COOMBS: At anytime did he say the American flag didn't mean anything to him?

ADRIAN LAMO: No.

DAVID COOMBS: At anytime did he say he wanted to help the enemy?

ADRIAN LAMO: Not in those words, no.

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